First Proposal for a World Wide Web

March 12, 1989

web25-significant-whiteTim Berners-Lee submits a proposal to CERN for developing a new way of linking and sharing information over the Internet. It was the first time Berners-Lee proposed a system that would ultimately become the World Wide Web. However, this proposal was a relatively vague request to research the details and feasibility of such a system. He would later submit a proposal on November 12, 1990 that much more directly detailed the actual implementation of the World Wide Web. So while some people consider today the birthday of the World Wide Web, I would put forth November 12, 1990 as a more accurate date.

NFL Adopts Instant Replay … For The First Time

NFL Instant ReplayMarch 11, 1986

The NFL adopts a limited instant replay system. This system was dropped, however, in 1992 before the current instant replay system was instated in 1999. In effect, you could say the current system is an instant replay itself!

Mr. Bell Calls Mr. Watson

Alexander Graham Bell With Early PhoneMarch 10, 1876

Alexander Graham Bell makes the fateful call to his assistant, Mr. Watson, which is considered the first phone call in history: “Mr. Watson come here I want you.”

I Invented the Internet

Al GoreMarch 9, 1999

United States Vice President Al Gore gives an interview on CNN’s Late Edition in which he states, “During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country’s economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system.” This is the infamous statement which will be widely misquoted as “I invented the Internet.”

IBM Introduces PC-XT

IBM PC-XTMarch 8, 1983

IBM introduces the IBM Personal Computer XT, which stands for eXtended Technology. For a price of $4,995, it features a Intel 8088 processor, a 10MB hard drive, eight expansion slots, serial port, 128 kB RAM, 40Kb ROM, a keyboard, and one double-sided 360kB floppy drive.

Bell Receives Patent for Telephone

Alexander Graham BellMarch 7, 1876

Alexander Graham Bell receives a patent (US No. 174,465) for an “Improvement in Telegraphy,” which will later come to be known as the variable resistance telephone.

Michelangelo Strikes

Michelangelo VirusMarch 6, 1992

The Michelangelo virus, so-named because it activates on March 6, the birthday of Michelangelo, begins infecting computers. The virus will also make news in 1993. It was one of the earliest viruses to receive widespread media attention and also one of the first to prompt widespread hysteria. The irony of the name of the virus was that nothing in the virus’ code referenced Michelangelo. It is possible the virus author, who was never identified, did not know March 6th was Michelangelo’s birthday!

Yahoo! Officially Launches

Yahoo! LogoMarch 5, 1995

The Yahoo! search engine officially launches on the Internet. 13 months later, Yahoo! will hold its IPO at a price of $13 per share. Yahoo!’s stock will peak at $475 in January 2000, and fall to $8.02 in September 2001.

Homebrew Computer Club Holds First Meeting

"Invitation to First Homebrew Computer Club meeting" by Gotanero - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons -

The invitation to the first meeting of the Homebrew Computer Club. Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

March 5, 1975

The Homebrew Computer Club holds its first meeting. Many people who played an important part in the early years of personal computing attended meetings of  the Homebrew Computer Club during its history. Perhaps no meeting was more important than the one that took place almost exactly one year after the first: Steve Wozniak brought his design for what eventually becomes the Apple I computer.

First Cray Supercomputer Shipped

Cray-1March 4, 1977

The first Cray-1 supercomputer is shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. This supercomputer, which costs nineteen million dollars, will be used to design sophisticated weapons systems. The system is a cylindrical tower seven feet tall, nine feet in diameter, and weighs about 5.5 tons. The machine produced so much heat that it required a built-in freon-based refrigeration system. It requires its own electrical substation to power it, at a cost of about US$35,000 a month.